Northwood Forestry Ltd

Goose Green Lane

Ashington

West Sussex

RH20 2LW

01798 813 029

 

Closeboard Fencing

Closeboard fencing, also known as Featheredge or Featherboard fencing, is renowned for its strength and versatility. It can be erected in its traditional flat top version or can be cut to either a concave or convex top. All the components are supplied separately and are generally erected in 3 meter long sections.

Typically, posts are either 100mm x 100mm in section or, for extra strength and durability, 100mm x 125mm in section. Where required, posts can be supplied ready morticed as intermediates, ends and both internal and external corners. The tops of the posts can be square, half or full backweathered, two way or four way weathered, round or domed; all to suit the customer’s preference.

The featheredge boards, which are sawn 2ex 25mm x 100mm, are of prime grade Oak for a top quality finish. These boards are supported by 2 or 3 triangular arris rails, dependant on the height of the fence, and generally rest on a 150mm high gravel board. The gravel board is attached to the post with small blocks known as cleats and a gravel stump is concreted into the ground at the midway point of each section to give rigidity and to support the lower arris rail to prevent the fence from sagging.

As a finishing touch, an optional counter and capping rail can also be supplied.

Galvanised nails should be used throughout.

Palisade Fencing

The general construction of Palisade fencing is similar to a Closeboard fence in that the posts and arris rails used are the same. The vertical palisades are placed with gaps between them and are supplied square, pointed, or rounded. Sections can be up to 3m long and are supported with a gravel stump at the midway point.

Galvanised nails should be used throughout.

Post and Rail Fencing

Post and Rail fencing has traditionally been used for enclosing fields and paddocks but can also be used as a domestic fence.

Posts are usually dug or driven into the ground dependant on circumstances and type. If sawn rails are used, they are nailed to the posts, whereas if cleft rails are used, they are set into mortices.